Serial Literature

Literature in weekly installments delivered to your email inbox.

An easy way to add one of the "all-time must read" books to your own "I read it!" list.

Read classic novels that were originally published in serial format in the way their authors originally intended.
If there is any other book you want to read in this format, please let me know using the contact form at the bottom of the page.

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas

117 installments

The novel "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas was first published in weekly installments in the newspaper "Journal des Débats", from August 1844 to January 1846.

The emails follow the rule of one chapter per email as I couldn't find the chapter division of the original installments online (I'd would appreciate if anyone knows it and let me know).

Which day(s) of the week do you prefer to receive a new installment?

And at which hour of the day? (the hours are already in your timezone)

morning

afternoon

evening

"The Count of Monte Cristo" is in the Public domain worldwide. If you don't want to read it through installments, you can access the complete book in several formats at the Project Gutenberg.

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

36 installments

The novel "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens was first published in weekly installments in a periodical, from December 1860 to August 1861.

The emails follow the exact chapter division of the original installments.

Which day(s) of the week do you prefer to receive a new installment?

And at which hour of the day? (the hours are already in your timezone)

morning

afternoon

evening

"Great Expectations" is in the Public domain worldwide. If you don't want to read it through installments, you can access the complete book in several formats at the Project Gutenberg.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas

Jules Verne

47 installments

The novel "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A World Tour Underwater" by Jules Verne was originally published in fortnightly installments in the periodical "Magasin d'éducation et de récréation", from March 1869 to June 1870.

The emails follow the rule of one chapter per email as I couldn't find the chapter division of the original installments online (I'd would appreciate if anyone knows it and let me know).

Which day(s) of the week do you prefer to receive a new installment?

And at which hour of the day? (the hours are already in your timezone)

morning

afternoon

evening

"Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A World Tour Underwater" is in the Public domain worldwide. If you don't want to read it through installments, you can access the complete book in several formats at the Project Gutenberg.

Madame Bovary

Gustave Flaubert

6 installments

The novel "Madame Bovary" by Gustave Flaubert was originally published in fortnightly installments in the periodical "La Revue de Paris", from October 1856 to December 1856.

The emails follow the original 6 installments division.

Which day(s) of the week do you prefer to receive a new installment?

And at which hour of the day? (the hours are already in your timezone)

morning

afternoon

evening

"Madame Bovary" is in the Public domain worldwide. If you don't want to read it through installments, you can access the complete book in several formats at the Project Gutenberg.

The Brothers Karamazov

Fyodor Dostoevsky

31 installments

The novel "The Brothers Karamazov" by Fyodor Dostoevsky was originally published in monthly installments in the periodical "Ру́сский ве́стник Russkiy Vestnik", from January 1879 to November 1880.

The original publication appeared in only 16 installments. The novel is divided in 12 "books" and an Epilogue, as devised by Dostoevsky. Each installment would be one book usually, except for four books that were divided into two installments.

Such lenghty installments seemed excessive for the email format, so I rearranged in groups of 2 to 5 chapters per email, reaching 31 installments.

Which day(s) of the week do you prefer to receive a new installment?

And at which hour of the day? (the hours are already in your timezone)

morning

afternoon

evening

"The Brothers Karamazov" is in the Public domain worldwide. If you don't want to read it through installments, you can access the complete book in several formats at the Project Gutenberg.